Im one of these people that have all intentions of going put to catch a sunrise and the next morning when the alarm goes off i end up turning it off or sleeping through it, Not Yesterday though, I actually planned this shoot and got up and headed to Roker Pier Lighthouse, which around 20 minutes from where I live.

I left the house 1 hour before sunrise and as I was driving the sky was red, the colour was low in the sky but i knew I was in for a treat this morning.

The night before I checked my apps, TPE, Storm and Clear outside. TPE is ver powerful, you can pin point a location and see the direction of the sun so you can plan those shoots with precision, Storm said it was going to be clear and Clear outside said small amount of cloud but all of which is high cloud, Now I must answer a question that I know you are asking yourself right now. High Cloud? High cloud is what you need for an amazing sunrise, if you have low cloud it will more than likely block any light or colour coming from the horizon. By having the high cloud it allows light from the sun a to bounce around and skim the cloud which can give some amazing colour.

I arrived 40 minutes from sunrise and the colour was fading from red to orange but was still plenty of colour and drama in the sky.

The first few shots I took, I wanted to show you the importance of composition. both shots are took within a few steps and a few minutes apart, both are un edited and are straight from the camera.

Which one is more appealing? both decent shots but both are so very different.

 

sunderland, sland, sunderland afc, roker, roker pier, seaburn, north east, how to, help, learn, flearn, tutorial, landscape, seascape, seaside, water, clouds, cloudjunky, sunrise, sun, hot, sunshine, sunfm, blog, blogger, blogging, writing, wordpress, sony, camera, lens, sony a6000

 

So which one did you choose? for me the correct composition here is number 2, the path draws your eye from left to right, and follows along till you reach the pier until you see the sunrise, Agree?

The setting for both these images were the same, nothing really special, no filters no special equipment just a tripod and my Sony a6000 with the Sony 55-200mm lens.

 

Some of you may have seen my tweet yesterday about one of the images I took. hers ho to achieve something similar. This can be achieved in camera, no need for any jigery pokery. I only use Lightroom to straighten image and clean it up a bit.

What I love about this image is the star burst to the sun, Its quite hard to see on this image as it was shot with a 12mm super wide lens so it looks as if everything is farther away than it actual is. But you don’t need expensive gear to be able to get this affect.

  • Start by setting your camera on a tripod – this is must when taking any image.
  • Set your camera to Manual mode
  • Adjust your aperture to F16 – this is a starting point but F16 should give you this affect. it doesn’t just work on the sun either, try shooting a nightscape with street lights, you get the same affect.
  • ISO 100 – 300
  • Set shutter speed to what ever your camera is reeding .- by this I mean take some test shots at different speeds till your happy. Light is different and can affect your shot in different ways so for to say set your shutter speed to ??? and your images doesn’t work then ill be to blame for giving false info, so its best to play around, You can see my settings below.
sunderland, sland, sunderland afc, roker, roker pier, seaburn, north east, how to, help, learn, flearn, tutorial, landscape, seascape, seaside, water, clouds, cloudjunky, sunrise, sun, hot, sunshine, sunfm, blog, blogger, blogging, writing, wordpress, sony, camera, lens, sony a6000
Sony A6000 – Sony 12mm – 0.5secs – iso1 00 – F16

 

 

Photalife

Im Lew – A blogger and father of two boys, three if you include the dog, living in Sunderland. Not sure I have the hang of this blog niche thing but hey ho, I’m doing it anyway – expect all sorts of randomness.

10 COMMENTS

  1. Great shots. I always think I should make the effort to get up for sunrise, but it’s too much hard work and a bit sporadic on when/where to go round here.

    I went straight to number 1 – I wouldn’t even have noticed the path directionleading to the sun without your mentioning it.

    • It hard I must admit. But this time of year is easy as sunrise is 8:30. So if you get to a location for 8. That’s plenty of time. That’s called rule of thirds. It’s a must in most images. From landscape to portrait

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